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Date: 1988-03 atari800xl.org comp.sys.atari.8bit
Info-Atari8 Digest V88 #22  
 
1.  "Anne_Tomlinson.osbunorth"  
 More options Mar 1 1988, 2:33 am
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: "Anne_Tomlinson.osbunorth"@XEROX.COM -
Date: 29 Feb 88 17:33:07 GMT
Local: Tues, Mar 1 1988 2:33 am
Subject: Re: Info-Atari8 Digest V88 #22
| | | | | | |
Editors:
Please remove me from this dl--apologies to the rest of the group if this goes
to everyone.

Thanks,
Anne


 
music (16-bit)  
 
1.  Steven W. Klassen  
 More options Mar 1 1988, 3:14 am
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: swklas@trillium.waterloo.edu (Steven W. Klassen) -
Date: 29 Feb 88 18:14:58 GMT
Local: Tues, Mar 1 1988 3:14 am
Subject: music (16-bit)
| | | | | | |
I have written a simple musical keyboard for the Atari 8-bit computers.
The only trouble is that the notes are not accurate (some of them seem
a bit flat) and that I only have a true 3-octave range.  I get a 4th
octave through the use of distortion but it does not sound very good.
I am aware that by combining two of the voices I can get 16-bit accuracy
and greater range.  I am capable of doing this, however, I do not know
what numeric values are required to produce each specific note
(eg. 'middle C').  If someone out there has a table with this info
could you please send it to me either through e-mail or through
the bit-net.  Please don't just refer me to DeRe Atari as I do
not have access to that publication.

If I can get this information I will be able to greatly improve the
quality of my musical program.  When this is done I will be
willing to either post the program to the bit-net or send it
to people through e-mail.

I sent a similar request a long time ago but lost my computer access
(ie. the semester ended) before I was able to see if there was a
reply.

Thanks in advance for any help.

Steven W. Klassen
Computer Science Major
University of Waterloo


 
 
2.  Gary D Duzan  
 More options Mar 3 1988, 6:08 am
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: gdt@vax1.acs.udel.EDU (Gary D Duzan) -
Date: 2 Mar 88 21:08:30 GMT
Local: Thurs, Mar 3 1988 6:08 am
Subject: Re: music (16-bit)
| | | | | | |
In article <5@watdragon.waterloo.edu> swklas@trillium.waterloo.edu (Steven W. Klassen) writes:

>I am aware that by combining two of the voices I can get 16-bit accuracy
>and greater range.  I am capable of doing this, however, I do not know
>what numeric values are required to produce each specific note
>(eg. 'middle C').  If someone out there has a table with this info
>could you please send it to me either through e-mail or through
>the bit-net.  Please don't just refer me to DeRe Atari as I do
>not have access to that publication.

Your wish is my command. Here is a list of 16 bit sound register values:

Note     Octave 0     Octave 1     Octave 2     Octave 3     Octave 4
----     --------     --------     --------     --------     --------
 C        54720        27357        13675         6834         3413
 C#       51649        25821        12907         6450         3222
 D        48750        24372        12182         6088         3040
 D#       46015        23003        11498         5746         2869
 E        43430        21712        10852         5423         2708
 F        40992        20493        10243         5118         2555
 F#       38691        19342        9668          4830         2412
 G        36519        18257        9125          4559         2276
 G#       34469        17231        8612          4303         2148
 A        32535        16264        8128          4061         2027
 A#       30708        15351        7672          3832         1913
 B        28984        14489        7241          3617         1805

Note     Octave 5     Octave 6     Octave 7     Octave 8
----     --------     --------     --------     --------
 C         1703         848          412          207
 C#        1607         800          397          195
 D         1517         755          374          183
 D#        1431         712          353          173
 E         1350         672          332          163
 F         1274         634          313          153
 F#        1202         598          295          144
 G         1134         564          278          136
 G#        1070         532          262          128
 A         1010         501          247          120
 A#        962          473          233          113
 B         899          446          219          106

You will have to dpoke these numbers into the proper registers with the proper
flags set for it to work at all. I hope this list helps. A similar list may be
found in "ATARI Assembly Language Programmer's Guide" by Moose and Lorenz,
Weber Systems, Inc., Chesterland, Ohio.

                                                Gary Duzan
                                                Time  Lord
                                            Third Regeneration
                                         Atari Enthusiast Extreme


 
Video Cables  
 
1.  "Hugh_E._Wells.ElSegundo"  
 More options Mar 1 1988, 4:04 am
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: "Hugh_E._Wells.ElSegundo"@XEROX.COM -
Date: 29 Feb 88 19:04:47 GMT
Local: Tues, Mar 1 1988 4:04 am
Subject: Re: Video Cables
| | | | | | |
The composite output from the 65XE, as with most all 8-bit Atari's, is
compatible with any video monitor or TV configured for composite signal input.
A direct connection from the computer to the monitor is proper.  A better
resolution in the picture quality is achieved by the elimination of the RF
transmitter/RF receiver portion of the computer/TV combination.  Some
degredation of signal quality  by the RF path.

The alternate monichrome configuration to composite is where vertical and
horizontal sync, and video are brought out separately for use by the monitor.
Composite video is the preferred output as it is easier to handle.

As for 80 columns, most color TV screens do not have enough pixel resolution to
support 80 columns adequately.  That is why most 80 column systems tend use a
monichrome screen.  Many patterns of character generation have been tried for
color TV screens in an attempt to achieve high resolu
80 columns is a tough road for a color TV monitor.

Hugh Wells


 
 
2.  DiMasi  
 More options Mar 3 1988, 9:26 am
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: n@ihlpm.ATT.COM (DiMasi) -
Date: 3 Mar 88 00:26:09 GMT
Local: Thurs, Mar 3 1988 9:26 am
Subject: Re: Video Cables
| | | | | | |

In article <880229-110709-1608@Xerox>, "Hugh_E._Wells.ElSegundo"@XEROX.COM.UUCP writes:
> The composite output from the 65XE, as with most all 8-bit Atari's, is
> compatible with any video monitor or TV configured for composite signal input.
> ....
> support 80 columns adequately.  That is why most 80 column systems tend use a
> monichrome screen.  Many patterns of character generation have been tried for
> color TV screens in an attempt to achieve high resolu
> 80 columns is a tough road for a color TV monitor.

I am not sure about the 65XE (since I don't own one), but I felt the need to
point out that the 130 XE has a color alternative to the composite output.
There are 2 other pins in the 5-pin DIN connector (which ones I can't say now,
as my manual is at home - but look in a 130XE manual if you can borrow one)
that provide 2 signals:  one, the "chroma" [chrominance], and the other,
the "luma" [luminance] signal.  There are also some monitors, that cost about
the same as "ordinary" color monitors did a couple of years or so ago, that
accept these signals.  The one I have is a Commodore 1802C.  I bought it at
a local discount store (Service Merchandise).  All I had to hack on was the
cable that came with the monitor: replace the Commodore 8-pin plug with a
5-pin plug, using the 130XE and 1802C manuals as a guide.  

It works quite well, and provides enough resolution for use with 80 columns,
at least for the 80col. display provided by OMNIVIEW, which is a very well-
worked-out GR. 8 - based rendition of a character set.  I am sure that a
monochrome monitor would appear even sharper, but I didn't want to play
"musical monitors," and where would I put it?  (I looked for a composite
monitor with a mono. mode, but never found such a beastie.  Existence proof,
anyone?)  Oh, yes - all the other graphics is sharper with the chroma/luma
monitor too, although artifacting is mostly [entirely?  Super 3D Plotter II
seems to be able to use it still] gone.  If anything, it's the artifacting
that makes the composite 80-column display unreadable (all I have to do
to see this is change cables and switch the 1802C to composite video mode).

Nick DiMasi
Uni'q Digital Technologies (Fox Valley Software subsidiary;
   ^          working as a contractor at AT&T Bell Labs in Naperville, IL)
(  | this is an accent mark, supposed to replace the dot over the 'i')


 
C compilers, Re: 256K, Re: stuff  
 
1.  "John D. DiMarco"  
 More options Mar 1 1988, 7:45 am
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: j@db.toronto.edu ("John D. DiMarco") -
Date: Mon, 29-Feb-88 17:45:59 EST
Local: Tues, Mar 1 1988 7:45 am
Subject: Re: C compilers, Re: 256K, Re: stuff
| | | | | | |
Lightspeed C (not Lightning C) is not the last word in C compilers - in
fact, it is Ralph Walden's rewrite of the ACE C compiler. It's functionality
is limited, and the compiler is not as complete as the CC8 compiler.  I think
it has a nicer user interface, though.  I don't know this for sure, however,
since I never bought the Lightspeed C compiler - I was considering it, but
as soon as I found out that it was less complete than CC8, I decided not to.

John
--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    John DiMarco           Hard work never killed a man ...
j@csri.toronto.edu          ... but it sure has scared lots of them!
{uunet!utai,watmath!utai,decvax,decwrl,ihnp4}!utcsri!jdd      j@utcsri.UUCP
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 
(none)  
 
1.  Puddin' Tame  
 More options Mar 3 1988, 10:32 am
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: A@ALASKA.BITNET (Puddin' Tame) -
Date: 3 Mar 88 01:32:33 GMT
Local: Thurs, Mar 3 1988 10:32 am
Subject: (none)
| | | | | | |

  I have a 320K XE (Peterson upgrade) and it works great.  I really love
the thing, but I have a few problems running some software written on it.
It appears that some of this "extended memory" software, such as the PD
type-setter, "The Works", will work on a 256K 800XL, but not with the 320K
130XE.  Does anyone know why?  Does anyone have a software emulator that
will circumvent the problem?  I want to run certain software, but I just
can't because of this.  Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Frank "The Paradox" Murphy

+-------------------------------------------------------+ The Public Domain BBS
|University of Alaska-Anchorage's Biggest Atari Fanatic |     (907)338-5005
|  and one of the Sysops of Alaska's Biggest Atari BBS  |      60+ Megs!!!
+-------------------------------------------------------+ Online games,cartoons


 
Problem with P:R: connection & Omnicom  
 
1.  Podell  
 More options Mar 3 1988, 11:31 am
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: Pod@DOCKMASTER.ARPA -
Date: 3 Mar 88 02:31:00 GMT
Subject: Problem with P:R: connection & Omnicom
| | | | | | |
I am using OmniCom with the P:R:  connection for the first time and have
a problem with the printer.  It hangs !!

When I try a print screen using SELECT+OPTION, or capture to printer, I
hear the program trying to access the printer, but it never succeeds.
It just trys foreever.

Does anyone have any experience that might help?

I did have some problems previously accessing the printer through the
P:R:  connection from XLEnt Word Processor, but it appeares to be
working OK now.

Thanks for your help.

Harold Podell


 
forwarded message re news postings.  
 
1.  Ravi Subrahmanyan  
 More options Mar 3 1988, 2:39 pm
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.st, comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: r@mcnc.org (Ravi Subrahmanyan) -
Date: 3 Mar 88 05:39:37 GMT
Local: Thurs, Mar 3 1988 2:39 pm
Subject: forwarded message re news postings.
| | | | | | |

#From: mcvax!lasso!ra@uunet.UU.NET (Ralph P. Sobek)
#Message-Id: <8803021020.AA07@lasso.laas.fr>
#To: info-atari16-requ@score.stanford.edu
#Subject: Truncated Info-Atari16 Digests
#Cc: info-atar@score.stanford.edu
#Status: RO
#
#I have just recovered #60 from one of the BITNET servers, and I found out
#why, in that case and probably more generally, the file was truncated in the
#initial version sent to me.  The problem was due to a lone period (.) at
#the beginning of a line!!  Some USENET (i.e., UNIX) mailers use exactly
#*that* representation to terminate a message.
#
#Is it possible to filter out such lines or precede them with "\" as do some
#other digests, before sending the digest out over the netwaves?
#
#Thanks in advance,
#
#       Ralph P. Sobek
#
#p.s.  For contributors, would you please desist in putting such lines (".")
#into your communications.
#


 
OmniCom key bindings  
 
1.  jhs  
 More options Mar 3 1988, 11:57 pm
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: j@MITRE-BEDFORD.ARPA -
Date: 3 Mar 88 14:57:56 GMT
Local: Thurs, Mar 3 1988 11:57 pm
Subject: Re: OmniCom key bindings
| | | | | | |

John Bunch writes:
> Could someone pleas tell me what the key bindings for omnicom are?  I would
> like to no what keys are the keypad keys...  Thanks..

The full documentation on OmniCom is still, as far as I know, available from
David Young, 421 Hanbee, Richardson TX 75080.  When you send in your $10
Shareware fee to David, he will send you a disk containing the latest version
of OmniCom, minus the Shareware message on the front and containing the user
manual in the file OC.DOC (or some such name).  As I understand it, support
for David's other products (and probably also OmniCom) are now available
through Wes Newell of Newell Industries, 602 E. Highway 78, Wylie, TX 75098.
Newell's phone number is (214) 442-6612.

The OmniCom manual is very clear and complete and well written, and explains a
lot of details in addition to the question you asked.  It is certainly worth
the $10 fee, if you plan to use OmniCom seriously.  (If you have a conscience,
you also gain the good feeling of being a legal user, too.)

However, in case you want to play around with the keypad to help you decide if
you want to pay to become a long-term legal owner, you'll find that the keypad
keys are over at the left end of the keyboard.  Specifically, the leftmost
four columns, plus B and N.

For what it's worth, I have found OmniCom to be an extremely satisfactory
substitute for a real vt100 in talking to my VAX at work from my Atari at
home.  The keypad feature makes it highly useable for my application.
It acts so much like my vt100 at work that I have no trouble at all swapping
back and forth between the two terminals.  If you need to do screen editing,
with keypad commands, it's still the only game in town so far as I know.  Not
only that, but it supports XMODEM and ASCII capture as well as KERMIT, and as
the "icing on the cake", it has a built-in "PRINT SCREEN" function that I find
immensely useful for quickly capturing short e-mail messages on paper.  At
$10, I think it is one of the best software values around.

-John Sangster

(I have no financial interest in CDY Consulting or OmniCom.)


 

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