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Date: 1988-04 atari800xl.org comp.sys.atari.8bit
boot disks  
 
1.  Edward L. Bayiates  
 More options Apr 1 1988, 4:49 am
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: e@BUENGC.BU.EDU (Edward L. Bayiates) -
Date: 31 Mar 88 19:49:08 GMT
Local: Fri, Apr 1 1988 4:49 am
Subject: Re: boot disks
| | | | | | |
Unfortunatly[D  (bad keyboard) Unfortunately, I have neither...do
you happen to know where to get theM (especially DeRe Atari?)

Thanks,

Ed Bayiates (elkbuengc.byu  elk buengc.bu.edu)


 
**** Info Requested ****  
 
1.  Luxo Jr.  
 More options Apr 1 1988, 6:00 am
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: bersa@td2cad.intel.com (Luxo Jr.) -
Date: 31 Mar 88 21:00:56 GMT
Local: Fri, Apr 1 1988 6:00 am
Subject: **** Info Requested ****
| | | | | | |

         Hello out there in Computer Land.  I need some info and I was
         hoping some informed soul could clue me in.  A friend asked
         me but I didn't know.  I don't know what the legalities are
         but does anyone know how to read (dump) the code from an
         Atari 800XL ROM cartridge???  Sure would appreciate the help.

               Thanx


 
vt100 emulators  
 
1.  DiMasi  
 More options Apr 1 1988, 8:55 am
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: n@ihlpm.ATT.COM (DiMasi) -
Date: 31 Mar 88 23:55:51 GMT
Local: Fri, Apr 1 1988 8:55 am
Subject: Re: Re: vt100 emulators
| | | | | | |
> ....
> However, I found that OmniCom's PRINT SCREEN function (an option that can be
> turned ON or OFF to "print all incoming data," as I distinctly remember it)  
> was unsatisfactory, because it wasn't able to do anything effective with the
> escape sequences typically sent to a VT100 for screen and cursor control.  
> Even "stripping out" the escape sequences would be better than PRINTING them,
> but not even THAT is done.  I found it completely impossible to print a data-
> base form-entry screen, once screen-painting was completed.  Did I miss a
> feature that lets you print an image of an EXISTING DISPLAY?
> ....

I think you have the Capture and Print-screen features mixed up.  Print screen
(I forget the key combination!  I think it's [SELECT][OPTION]) dumps, to the
P: device, whatever is on the screen.  Capture mode puts a copy of all
incoming characters (or at least most of them) to a user-specified device.
Print screen works fine for me, but not Capture.  I think I'm on to a BIG clue,
though - when I tried capture to a D: file instead of to P:, many of the
characters were inverse video when I looked at the file.  Hmm, 8th bit flipping
around, eh?  Parity?  I have to make parity=none to get xmodem (binary files)
to work, so I wonder what's going on.

Nick DiMasi
Uni'q Digital Technologies (Fox Valley Software subsidiary;
   ^          working as a contractor at AT&T Bell Labs in Naperville, IL)
(  | this is an accent mark, supposed to replace the dot over the 'i')


 
R: emulators for atari modems  
 
2.  Tim Charron  
 More options Apr 5 1988, 1:51 am
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: tpchar@dahlia.waterloo.edu (Tim Charron) -
Date: 4 Apr 88 16:51:34 GMT
Local: Tues, Apr 5 1988 1:51 am
Subject: R: emulators for atari modems
| | | | | | |
This is a request to the net for information.  I currently have an atari xm301
modem, and would like to have 80-column emulation.  The only possibilities that
I've found so far are by using either KERMIT65 or OMNICOM.  The problem is that
both of these emulators use the R: handler, and the atari modems have a T:
handler.  I need some sort of R: emulator for my system.

I've heard of a program called SMARTT which may work.  If anyone has info on
it or any other alternative (software) solutions, I'd appreciate them.

Thanks.
Tim Charron
-----------------------------
tpchar@dahlia.waterloo.edu


 
NTSC decoders (was Re: vt100 emulators)  
 
3.  Robert Jung  
 More options Apr 6 1988, 2:24 am
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: r@castor.usc.edu (Robert Jung) -
Date: 5 Apr 88 17:24:44 GMT
Local: Wed, Apr 6 1988 2:24 am
Subject: NTSC decoders (was Re: vt100 emulators)
| | | | | | |

In article <8803290303.AA02@mitre-bedford.ARPA> j@MITRE-BEDFORD.ARPA writes:
> [Lots of stuff about VT-100 emulators deleted]

>With either of these programs, you should use a monochrome monitor if at all
>possible, because 80-column emulation on an 8-bit Atari pushes the graphics
>resolution to the limit.  Next best would be a composite monitor that has a
>separate chroma input, or an RGB monitor with an external NTSC decoder
>(or just drive the Green input with the Atari luminance signal).

  Please forgive me if this question sounds stupid or ridiculous (I don't
know *anything* about hardware), but do you know where I can buy a
commercial NTSC decoder for my 8-bit Atari?

  If nothing else, how about detailed instructions for making one?

  Any information will be appreciated,

                                                --R.J.
                                                B-)
______________________________________________________________________________
Bitnet: r@castor.usc.edu              "Who needs an Amiga?"    = == =    
                                                                   = == =    
                  Power WithOUT the Price                          = == =    
                                                               ===== == =====
   Just because it's 8-bits doesn't make it obsolete.          ====  ==  ====


 
 
4.  Robert Jung  
 More options Apr 6 1988, 2:24 am
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: r@castor.usc.edu (Robert Jung) -
Date: 5 Apr 88 17:24:44 GMT
Local: Wed, Apr 6 1988 2:24 am
Subject: NTSC decoders (was Re: vt100 emulators)
| | | | | | |

In article <8803290303.AA02@mitre-bedford.ARPA> j@MITRE-BEDFORD.ARPA writes:
> [Lots of stuff about VT-100 emulators deleted]

>With either of these programs, you should use a monochrome monitor if at all
>possible, because 80-column emulation on an 8-bit Atari pushes the graphics
>resolution to the limit.  Next best would be a composite monitor that has a
>separate chroma input, or an RGB monitor with an external NTSC decoder
>(or just drive the Green input with the Atari luminance signal).

  Please forgive me if this question sounds stupid or ridiculous (I don't
know *anything* about hardware), but do you know where I can buy a
commercial NTSC decoder for my 8-bit Atari?

  If nothing else, how about detailed instructions for making one?

  Any information will be appreciated,

                                                --R.J.
                                                B-)
______________________________________________________________________________
Bitnet: r@castor.usc.edu              "Who needs an Amiga?"    = == =    
                                                                   = == =    
                  Power WithOUT the Price                          = == =    
                                                               ===== == =====
   Just because it's 8-bits doesn't make it obsolete.          ====  ==  ====


 
Booting up without AUTORUN.SYS  
 
1.  flex  
 More options Apr 1 1988, 6:16 pm
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: f@cup.portal.com -
Date: 1 Apr 88 09:16:28 GMT
Local: Fri, Apr 1 1988 6:16 pm
Subject: Re: Booting up without AUTORUN.SYS
| | | | | | |

Hmmm, didn't know that there were any Atari 8-biters left out there...!

Anyways, concerning creating Boot Load Disk programs. The best place for a
technical reference is The Atari Technical Reference Notes -- a collection of
usage notes written by the creators of the Operating System themselves. This
pre-dates the acclaimed De Re Atari and of course OSS's Inside Atari DOS. In
fact these reference notes were internal Atari Corp documents, later released
to the public.

Oh well, here's the "Great Secret". Heh.

The normal Atari disk format (single density) consists of 720 sectors, of
which only 719 is used by DOS (a boo-boo, but dats another story!). When the
Atari is Cold-Booted connected to a disk, the OS will attempt (among other
things) to "boot" from the disk drive. The OS will read in Disk Sector #1 into
its Cassette Buffer at $0400 (yea crazy, but so what.)

Of this 128 byte record, only the first SIX bytes have any initial signi-
ficance:

 BYTE #1    Boot Flag     Thrown away by the OS due to meaness, stored at
                          DFLAGS $0240 for fun while its at it.

 BYTE #2    Rec to read   The number of sequential disk sectors (records)
                          to read in after this initial read. DBSECT $0241

 BYTE #3,4  Load Address  Where to move this boot sector (#1) in memory
                          following the Lo,Hi 6502 word address format.
                          Saved in BOOTAD $0242.

 BYTE #5,6  Init Address  The Initialization Address (Lo,Hi) for this prog.
                          Saved in DOSINI $C

So after the Atari looks at these first SIX bytes of Disk BOOT Sector (#1)
then it goes like how you expect. This first record (#1) is moved to the
address specified by BOOTAD. Then the OS will read in sequentially (like
Disk Sector #2 and on...) the number of sectors (also called records) as
specified by DBSECT. As one can figure out, DBSECT is decremented
internally by one till a BEQ state exists. So an initial value of ZERO for
DBSECT allows 256 sectors to be read in. Remember this is jus a boot load,
and a small program can be read in to read in additional disk sectors in
any order, to any address. This is called a multi-boot process.

As a side note, you may be a wonderin how in the world one can write a
program to read in additional disk sectors after the inital boot process,
without DOS present?

Well, how da ya think the OS can read in the boot sector in the first
place...? Yup, there is a Resident Disk Handler in the OS that is a low-
level access of a disk (lower than CIO... actually called SIO for Serial
Input/Output, but dats still another story).

So dats about it. The OS reads in the required amount of sectors and
stores it anywhere in memory, as specified by BOOTAD. When Atari DOS 2.0
gets booted in, the BOOTAD is set at $700. But as you have seen, it can
be anywhere in memory a programmer chooses.

Oh yea. After the initial boot disk load ends, what happens? Well, FIRST
the OS will AUTOMATICALLY jsr to BOOTAD+6. This "feature" to befuddle the
masses is called a multi-stage boot. Jus do a CLC/RTS combo to get it
outta here correctly. After this, the OS will then jsr to DOSIN.
And dat is where your boot loaded program should be!

Opps, in the jsr to DOSIN coding, a RTS will push the OS to JMP to
DOSVEC ($A), so ya better set DOSVEC in ya code to an address. However,
a RTS in your DOSIN coding ain't necessary.

If anyone has anymore questions about this, or about Atari 8-bits in
general, jus leave a note!


 
Microsoft Basic  
 
1.  Stan Lackey  
 More options Apr 2 1988, 1:32 am
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: lac@Alliant.COM (Stan Lackey) -
Date: 1 Apr 88 16:32:47 GMT
Local: Sat, Apr 2 1988 1:32 am
Subject: Microsoft Basic
| | | | | | |
I recently saw a new? version of BASIC called like BASIC II by Microsoft
or something in my local software store.  The package doesn't try very hard
to sell it, though; all it has is slick marketing stuff, and no technical
information.  Does anyone know what it has in the way of value-added over
the standard Atari issue, and/or Turbo Basic?
-Stan

 
 
2.  fireplace  
 More options Apr 4 1988, 5:56 pm
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: firepl@cup.portal.com -
Date: 4 Apr 88 08:56:54 GMT
Local: Mon, Apr 4 1988 5:56 pm
Subject: Re: Microsoft Basic
| | | | | | |

In article <1@alliant.Alliant.COM>, lac@Alliant.COM (Stan Lackey) asks
about ATARI Microsoft BASIC II.

ATARI Microsoft BASIC II is not new.  It was released in 1983 by ATARI, Inc.
It was the successor to ATARI Microsoft BASIC (disk).  The language is on a
16K cartridge, with extensions on disk.  It is a very complete and powerful
implementation of Microsoft BASIC, the so-called standard.

Remember, keep the 8-bit alive - PURCHASE SOFTWARE!    firepl@cup.portal.com
And you know how painful that can be...     sun!portal!cup.portal.com!fireplace

~~SORRY, YOUR TERMINAL DOES NOT SUPPORT HOLOGRAPHIC IMAGES - GRAPHICS SKIPPED~~


 
 
3.  USENET News System  
 More options Apr 6 1988, 9:23 pm
Newsgroups: comp.sys.atari.8bit
From: use@shell.com (USENET News System) -
Date: 6 Apr 88 12:23:35 GMT
Local: Wed, Apr 6 1988 9:23 pm
Subject: Re: Microsoft Basic
| | | | | | |
Yes, it is a very powerful implementation. I would recommend using it only
for limited idea testing, though. Seems like you get about 20k from after
loading the extensions and that might make things a little tight. As far
as compatibility with other versions of MSB (my experience is with CP/M
MSB ), not too much has to be changed. Maybe the OPEN statments. And
a few other stuff (CP/M MSB does not have the atari graphics commands.)

 I used mine in grad school for calculations in E&M, and quantum. When I
 had the idea fully thought out, I'd translate the program to FORTRAN  and
 run it on the university mainframe.
From: s@shell.com (Steve V. Hovater)
Path: shell!svh

One thing you might notice, is that the syntax checking you may be accustomed to
in regular Atari Basic is not present in MSB 2 - it's done at runtime.
Which may or may not be to everyone's liking.

Disclaimer: These opinions are ordinarily my own, and couldn't possibly
            reflect the views or opinions of my employer.

Steven V. Hovater
(713) 663-2711
..!{rice,sun,psuvax,ut-sally,ihnp4,soma}!shell!svh       s@shell.com


 

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